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NICEIC Site Guide for Electrical Installations Up To 100A to BS7671:2018+A2:2022 Edition 2022 (PDF)

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About the book:

Publisher: NICEIC
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
Pages: 318
Edition: 2022
Language: English
Size: 115 Mb

Complies with BS7671:201 8+A2:2022.

Content:

CHAPTER 1. Introduction
1.1 Scope 3
1.2 Statutory and non-statutory requirements 3
1.2.1 Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 3
1.2.2 Electricity at Work Regulations 3
1.2.3 Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 6
1.2.4 Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 8
1.2.5 Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations 9
1.2.6 The Building Regulations 10
1.2.6.1 England and Wales. The Building Regulations 2010 10
1.2.6.2 Notifiable work - Wales 12
1.2.6.3 Notifiable work - England 14
1.2.6.4 Certification of notifiable work 14
1.2.6.5 Building (Scotland) Regulations 15
1.2.6.6 Building Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2012 16
1.2.7 Electrical Safety Standards in the Private Rented Sector (PRS) 17
1.2.8 BS 7671 19
1.3 Guidance 20
1.3.1 Health and Safety Executive HSR25 20
1.3. 1.1 HSR25- The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 - Guidance on the Regulations 20
1.3.1.2 GS38 - Electrical test equipment for low voltage electrical systems 22
1.3.1.3 Other Guidance 23
1.3.2 Electrical Safety First  23
1.3.2.1 Best Practice Guides 23
1.3.2.2 The Wiring Regulations Advisory Group (WRAG) 24
1.3.3 NICEIC 2 4
CHAPTER 2. Supply Systems and Earthing & Bonding 25
2.1 The service position 27
2.2 System types and earthing arrangements 27
2.3 Supply system earthing 30
2.4 Installation earthing 30
2.5 Means of earthing 33
2.6 Responsibility for providing, assessing and verifying the means of earthing 3 4
2.7 Main protective bonding 35
2.8 Supplementary bonding 40
2.9 Sizing of circuit protective conductors 44
2.10 Earthing arrangements where an installation contains equipment having high protective conductor currents 44
CHAPTER 3. Protective Devices 47
3.1 Introduction to protective devices 49
3.2 Cartridge fuses 49
3.2.1 BS88 49
3.2.2 BS 1361 50
3.23 BS 1362   51
3.3 Semi-enclosed fuses to BS 3036 52
3.4 Circuit-breakers 52
3.4.1 BS EN 60898  52
3.4.2 BS 3871  F 56
3.5 Residual current devices 56
3.5.1 RCCBsto BS EN 61008 and BS 4293 57
3.5.2 RCBOsto BS EN 61009  57
3.5.3 Classification of RCDs (RCD type) 58
3.5.4 RCD protected socket-outlets and fused connection units  59
3.5.5 Typical applications for RCDs in domestic premises 60
3.6 Arc fault detection devices (AFDDs) 61
3.6.1 Testing AFDDs  62
3.7 Overvoltage protection and surge protective devices (SPDs) 63
CHAPTER 4. Protection Against Electric Shock 65
4.1 General 67
4.2 Provisions for basic protection 69
4.3 Protective measure: Automatic disconnection of supply (ADS) 69
4.3.1 Protective earthing  69
4.3.2 Protective equipotential bonding 70
4.3.3 Automatic disconnection in caseof a fault 70
4.3. 3.1 TN system 71
4.3. 3.2 TT system 72
4.3.4 Additional protection by RCD 73
4.4 Protective measure: Double or reinforced insulation 75
4.5 Protective measure: Electrical separation 76
4.6 Protective measure: Extra-low voltage provided by SELV or PELV 76
4.6.1 Requirements for basic protection and fault protection 77
4.6.2 Sources for SELV and PELV 78
4.6.3 Accessories 79
4.6.4 Additional requirements for SELVcircuits.  80
4.7 Additional protection 80
4.7.1 RCDs 80
4.7.2 Supplementary protective equipotential bonding  80
CHAPTER 5. Consumer Unit & Distribution Board Arrangements 81
5.1 Introduction 83
5.2 Split-load arrangements 84
5.3 Advantages and disadvantages of a split-load consumer unit 85
5.4 Series connected RCDs 86
5.5 Selectivity between RCDs in series 87
5.6 Selectivity between an upstream overcurrent protective device and an RCD 88
5.7 Selectivity between an RCD and a downstream overcurrent protective device 89
5.7.1 . Total selectivity is not always required 89 1
5.8 Installations forming part of a TT system 90
5.9 Protective conductor currents 91
5.10 Consumer unit location 92
5.11 Separation of electrical cables and accessories from the gas installation pipework 92
5.12 Mounting height 93
5.13 Dwellings liable to flooding 94
CHAPTER 6. Isolation and Switching 95
6.1 Introduction and terminology 97
6.1.1 Installations supplied from more than one source 99
6.1.2 Live parts not capable of being isolated by a single device  100
6.2 Isolating devices 100
6.3 Functional switching 102
6.3.1 Opening contacts are not essential 103
6.4 Switching off for mechanical maintenance 103
6.5 Emergency switching off 103
SITE GUIDE
CHAPTER 7. Identification and Labelling 105
7.1 Introduction and general requirements 107
7.2 Identification of switchgear and controlgear 107
7.3 Identification of conductors 108
7.3.1 Single-phase installations 108
7.3.2 Identification of switch -wires 108
7.3.3 Extensions, alterations or repairs to an existing single-phase installation 109
7.3.4 Three-phase installations 109
7.3.5 Summary of conductor identification 111
7.4 Protective devices H 1
7.5 Charts, diagrams, tables and circuit information 112
7.6 Voltage 112
7.7 Isolation 112
7.8 Periodic inspection and testing H 3
7.9 RCD test button 113
7.10 Earthing and bonding connections H 3
7.11 Alternative or additional supplies 114
7.12 Circuits having a high protective conductor current 115
7.13 Presence of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems 115
7.14 Presence of Surge Protective Devices (SPDs) 115
CHAPTER 8. Distribution Circuits 117
8.1 Introduction 119
8.2 Load centres and supplies to other buildings 119
8.3 Assessment of current demand 121
8.4 Voltage drop 121
8.5 Disconnection times 121
8.6 Recording of circuit details 122
CHAPTER 9. Final Circuits 123
9.1 Introduction 125
9.2 Circuits supplying socket-outlets 125
9.2.1 Radial final circuit 126
9.2.2 Ring final circuit 127
9.2.3 Spurs 128
9.3 Permanently connected loads 128
9.4 Lighting circuits 129
9.4.1 Introduction 129
9.4.2 Ceiling roses 130
9.4.3 Luminaire supporting couplers  130
9.5 Voltage drop 132
9.6 Extra-low voltage lighting installations 132
CHAPTER 10. Factors Relating to Installation of Wiring Systems & Cables 137
10.1 Wiring systems - types 141
10.2 Applications of cables for fixed wiring 141
10.3 Installation methods 143
10.4 Wiring in lofts 145
10.5 External influences 146
10.5.1 Ambient temperature (522.1) 147
10.5.2 External heat sources (522.2) 147
10.5.3 Water and high humidity (522.3) 148
10.5.4 Solid and foreign bodies (522.4) 148
10.5.5 Corrosive and polluting substances (522.5) 148
10.5.6 Impact (522.6) 148
10.5.6.1 Meeting the requirements of Regulation 522.6.204 149
10.5.6.2 Regulation 522.6.204 Option (i) cable incorporating an earthed metallic covering 149
10.5.6.3 Regulation 522.6.204 Options (ii) & (iii) cables enclosed in earthed metallic conduit or trunking 151
10.5.6.4 Regulation 522.6.204 Option (iv) the provision of mechanical protection 151
10.5.6.5 Regulation 522.6.204 Option (v) the use of SELV or PELV meeting the requirement of Regulation Group 414.4 151
10.5.7 Protection of concealed cables in floors and ceilings 152
10.5.8 Protection of concealed cables in walls 153
10.5.8.1 Walls with an internal construction NOT containing significant metallic parts 153
10.5.8.2 Walls with an internal construction containing significant metallic parts 156
10.5.9 Protection of cables embedded in plastered walls 157
10.5.10 Other mechanical stresses (52Z8) 158
10.5.11 Damage caused during installation 158
10.5.12 Means of access to withdrawable wiring systems 158
10.5.13 Bending radii   159
10.5.14 Flexible wiring systems 160
10.5.15 Presence of fauna (522.10), flora and / or mould growth (522.9) 161
10.5.16 Solar and ultraviolet radiation 163
10.5.17 Solar gain  164
10.6 Impact (522.6) 164
10.6.1 Penetration of elements of building construction by wiring systems 164
10.6.2 Chases in walls  168
10.7 Connections 169
10.7.1 General 169
10.7.2 Fundamental requirements 169
10.7.3 Selection of means of connection and termination 169
10.7.3.1 Material of the conductor and its insulation 170
10.7.3.2 Number and shape of the wires forming the conductor 171
10.7.3.3 Cross-sectional area of the conductor 171
10.7.3.4 The number of conductors to be connected together 171
10.7.3.5 The temperature attained by the terminals in normal service 171
10.7.3.6 Soldered connections 172
10.7.3.7 Provision of adequate locking arrangements 172
10.7.3.8 External influences 172
10.7.4 Enclosure of connections 173
10.7.5 Protection against electric shock 173
10.7.5. 1 Basic protection 173
10.7.5.2 Fault protection 173
10.7.6 Accessibility of connections 174
10.7.7 Protective conductor connections involving the metal sheath or armouring or metal enclosure 174
10.8 Cable supports 174
10.8.1 General 174
10.8.2 Surfaces in contact with a cable 174
10.8.3 Suitability for external influences 175
10.8.4 Avoidance of electrolytic corrosion 175
10.8.5 Enclosure of non-sheathed cables 175
10.8.5.1 Vertical runs of trunking or ducting exceeding 5 m in length 175
10.8.5.2 Vertical runs of conduit exceeding 5 m in length 175
10.8.5.3 Vertical runs of cable supported from the top 175
10.8.6 Cables resting without fixings 176
10.8.7 Spacing between supports 176
10.8.8 Wiring system supports 177
10.8.9 Protected escape routes  178
10.9 Provision of fire barriers, sealing arrangements so as to minimise the spread of fire 179
CHAPTER 11. Special Installations and Locations 181
11.1 Introduction and scope 184
11.2 Locations containing a bath o r shower 184
11.2.1 Zones 185
11.2.2 Protection against electric shock  189
11.2.2.1 General 189
11.2.2.2 Additional protection 189
11.2.2.3 SELVandPELV 189
11.2.2.4 Supplementary protective equipotential bonding 189
11.2.3 Selection and erection 190
1 1.2.3.1 External influences 190
1 1.2.3.2 Switchgear, controlgear and accessories 191
11.2.3.3 Current-using equipment 193
11 .2.3.4 Electric floor heating systems 194
11.3 Swimming pools 196
11.3.1 Zones  197
11.3.1.1 Zones0 and 1 of a swimming pool 199
11.3.1.2 Zone 2 of a swimming pool 199
11.3.2 Protection against electric shock
11.3.2.1 General 200
11.3.2.2 SELV 200
11.3.2.3 Supplementary equipotential bonding 200
11.3.3 Selection and erection 202
11.3.3.1 External influences 202
11.3.3.2 Degrees of protection of enclosures against water ingress 202
11.3.3.3 Wiring systems 202
11.3.3.4 Switchgear and controlgear 203
11.3.3.5 Current-using equipment of swimming pools 203
11.3.3.6 Underwater luminaires for swimming pools 204
11.3.3.7 Special requirements relating to the installation of electrical equipment in zone 1 of swimming pools 205
11.3.3.8 Accessibility 205
11.3.4 Protective Multiple Earthing (PME)  206
11.4.1 Temperature zones 207
11.4.2 Protection against electric shock 208
11.4.3 Additional protection by RCDs 208
11.4.4 SELV or PELV 208
11.4.5 Selection and erection of equipment 209
11.4.6 Wiring systems 209
11.4.7 Isolation, switching, control and accessories 209
11.5 Lighting installations 210
11.6 Electric vehicle charging installations 210
11.6.1 Charging modes 210
11.6.1.1 Mode 2 charging 210
11.6.1.2 Mode 3 charging 211
11.6.1.3 Type 2 plugs, socket-outlets and connectors 212
11.6.1.4 Mode 4 charging 212
11.6.2 Requirements of BS 7671  213 1
11.6.2.1 Maximum demand and diversity 213
11.6.2.2 Protection against electric shock 213
11.6.2.3 PEN conductor failure in the distribution network 214
11.6.2.4 Where Protective Multiple Earthing (PME)conditions apply 216
11.6.2.5 TT system earthing 218
11.6.2.6 Protection against external influences 218
11.6.2.7 RCDs 219
11.6.2.8 Overcurrent protection 220
11.6.2.9 Compatibility with prosumer's low voltage electrical installations 220
11.6.2.10 Miscellaneous requirements 220
CHAPTER 12. Electrical Equipment Outside of the Dwelling 221
12.1 Increased risk of electric shock 223
12.2 Additional protection by means of an RCD 224
12.3 Electrical equipment 225
12.3.1 Buried cables 225
12.3.2 Surface-installed cables 226
12.3.3 Armoured cable terminations 227
12.3.4 Socket- outlets 227
12.3.5 Lighting  227
12.4 Equipment for use in ponds 229
CHAPTER 13. Additional Sources of Supply 231
13.1 Introduction 233
13.2 BS 7671 requirements for generators to operate in parallel 235
13.3 Energy Networks Association G98 238
13.4 Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems 240
13.4.1 General 240
13.4.2 The DC side 241
13.4.2.1 Protection against effects of insulation faults 242
13.4.2.2 Wiring system 242
13.4.2.3 Protection against electromagnetic disturbances 243
13.4.2.4 Protection against overcurrent on the DC side 243
13.4.2.5 Protection of PV string cables 244
13.4.2.6 Protection of PV sub-array cables 245
13.4.3 Isolation and switching 245
13.4.4 Selection and erection of equipment 246
13.4.5 The AC side 247
13.4.5.1 RCDs 247
13.4.5.2 Protection against overvoltage of atmospheric origin or due to switching 248
13.4.6 Further information 249
13.5 Prosumer’s low voltage installation 249
CHAPTER 14. Inspection and Testing 251
14.1 Initial verification 253
14.2 Periodic inspection 254
14.2.1 General 254
14.2.2 Details of the installation to be inspected 254
14.2.3 Limitations on the inspection and testing 256
14.2.4 Sampling 257
CHAPTER 15. Testing 259
15.1 Introduction 262
15.2 Safety 262
15.3 Sequence of tests - initial verification 263
15.4 Sequence of tests - periodic inspection 265
15.5 Testing continuity 266
15.5.1 Test instrument 266
15.5.2 Measurement errors resulting from parallel paths 266
15.5.3 Resistance of test instrument leads 266
115.5.4 Continuity of protective conductors . 268
15.5.4.1 Why do we need to test the continuity of protective conductors? 268
15.5.4.2 (R1 + R2) method 268
15.5.4.3 R2 method (‘wander lead’) 270
15.5.5 Continuity of ring final circuit conductors  272
15.5.5.1 Why do we need to check the continuity of ring final circuit conductors? 272
15.5.5.2 Procedure: 272
15.5.6 Insulation resistance 275
15.5.6.1 General 275
15.5.6.2 Testing 276
15.5.6.3 Testing of low voltage circuits and FELV circuits after the connection of equipment 277
15.5.6.4 Testing where protection is provided by SELV,PELV or electrical separation 278
15.5.7 Polarity  280
15.5.7.1 By continuity methods (with circuit de-energised) 280
15.5.7.2 Verifying the polarity of an incoming supply (or an existing live circuit) 280
15.5.8 Protection by automatic disconnection of the Supply (ADS) 281
15.5.9 Measurement of external earth fault loop impedance (Ze )  281
15.5.9.1 Earth electrode resistance 283
15.5.10 Prospective fault current at the origin 284
15.5.11 Circuit earth fault loop impedance (Zs) 284
15.5.12 RCDs  286
15.5.12.1 Operation of RCDs 287
15.5.12.2 RCD testing 287
15.5.12.3 RCD test procedure 288
15.5.13 Functional testing 289
15.5.14 Certification and reporting 290
APPENDIX A. Safe Isolation 291
A.1 Safe isolation 291
APPENDIX B. Resistance of Copper Conductors 297
B.1 Resistance of copper conductors 297
B.2 Conductor resistance values at a conductor temperature other than 20 °C 298
B.3 Calculation of conductor resistance at 3 0 °C 298
B.4 Conductor resistance at 70 °C 299
B.5 Further information on conductor temperature correction multiplication factors 299

Tags: NICEIC Site Guide up to 100 A BS7671:2018+A2:2022, NICEIC Guide BS7671:2018+A2:2022, Site Guide For Electrical 2022 pdf

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Reviews (2)
Noel
Noel
02/10/2022
This publication is very helpful for self-study. Exactly what I was looking for!
Jorge
Jorge
23/06/2022
Bought it for college. All fine.
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