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Electrical Installation Design Guide. Calculations for Electricians and Designers 5th Edition 2022, updated to BS7671:2018+A2:2022 (PDF)

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About the book:

Publisher: IET
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
Pages: 217
Edition: 2022
Language: English
Size: 105 Mb

Complies with BS7671:201 8+A2:2022.

Content:

Cooperating organizations 9
Preface 10
Section 1 Design sequence 11
1.1 Load characteristics 11
1.1.1 Load and location (Section 3) 11
1.1.2 Standby systems 12
1.2 Supply characteristics 12
1.3 Installation outline 12
1.4 Distribution design 12
1.4.1 Protective devices and cables (Section 4) 12
1.4.2 Voltage drop (Section 5) 12
1.4.3 Prospective fault currents (Section 6) 12
1.4.4 Shock protection (Section 7) 13
1.4.5 Selection of protective conductors (Section 8) 13
1.4.6 Special installations or locations 13
1.5 Standard final circuits 13
1.6 Isolation and switching 13
1.7 Final assessment 13
1.8 BS7671 13
1.8.1 Departures 13
Section 2 Simple installations and final circuits 15
2.1 Introduction 15
2.2 Supply characteristics 15
2.2.1 General 15
2.2.2 Earthing arrangements 16
2.2.3 Declared supply characteristics 17
2.3 Fault rating of switchgear 18
2.4 Final circuit overcurrent protective devices and cables 18
2.4.1 Radial final circuits 19
2.4.2 Circuits without overload protection 20
2.4.3 Circuits with overload protection 20
2.4.4 30 and 32 A ring final circuits 22
2.5 Final circuit voltage drop limitations 22
2.5.1 Maximum cable length (Lvd) to meet voltage drop limits (i.e. 5 % of 230 V= 11.5 V, or 3 % for lighting = 6.9 V to comply with Regulation 525.202 of BS 7671) 22
2.5.2 Radial final circuit voltage drop 23
2.5.3 Ring final circuit voltage drop 24
2.6 Fault protection 25
2.6.1 Example 1: radial final circuit 26
2.6.2 Example 2: ring final circuit 26
2.7 Short-circuit current protection 27
2.8 Protective conductors T1
2.9 Standard final circuits 28
Section 3 Maximum demand and diversity 29
3.1 Introduction 29
3.2 Installation outline 31
3.3 Final circuit current demand 32
3.3.1 Examples of circuit current demand 33
3.4 Diversity between final circuits 34
3.4.1 Simple installations 34
3.5 Complex installations 38
3.5.1 Accuracy 38
3.5.2 Estimation method 38
Section 4 Selection of cables for current-carrying capacity 4 5
4.0 Symbols 45
4.1 Preliminary design 45
4.2 Overcurrent requirements 46
4.2.1 Fault currents 46
4.2.2 Overload currents 46
4.2.3 Small overloads 47
4.3 Current-carrying capacity tables 48
4.3.1 Tabulated current-carrying capacity lt 48
4.3.2 Ambient temperature rating factor Ca 50
4.3.3 Group rating factor Cg 51
4.3.4 Thermal insulation factor Q 55
4.3.5 Overcurrent protective device and buried circuit rating factors Cf, Cc, Cs and Cd 56
4.3.6 Conductor operating temperature 57
4.4 Protection against overload and short circuit 57
4.4.1 General 57
4.4.2 Overcurrent protection of conductors in parallel 58
4.5 Protection against fault current only (omission of overload protection) 59
4.5.1 Example 59
4.6 Corrections for grouping not liable to simultaneous overload 61
4.6.1 Example 61
4.7 Motors 62
4.7.1 Example 1 62
4.7.2 Example 2 63
4.7.3 Example 3 64
Section 5 Voltage drop 67
5.1 Voltage drop in consumers' installations 67
5.2 Distribution system voltage drop 67
5.3 Basic voltage drop calculation 68
5.3.1 Single-phase 68
5.3.2 Three-phase voltage drop 69
5.3.3 Summing voltage drop 70
5.4 Correction for inductance 70
5.4.1 Example 71
5.5 Correction for load power factor 72
5.5.1 Example 72
5.6 Correction for conductor operating temperature 73
5.6.1 Example 74
5.7 Correction for both conductor operating temperature and load power factor 74
Section 6 Calculation of fault current 7 5
6.1 Determination of prospective fault current 75
6.2 Determined by enquiry 77
6.2.1 General 7 7
6.2.2 Enquiry - maximum prospective short-circuit current, single-phase supplies up to 100 A 77
6.2.3 Enquiry - maximum prospective fault current, three-phase supplies 78
6.2.4 Enquiry - maximum earth fault loop impedances 79
6.3 Determined by calculation 79
6.3.1 Voltage range 79
6.3.2 Calculation - maximum prospective fault current lpf 80
6.3.3 Calculation - minimum prospective fault current lef 82
6.3.4 Example calculations 82
Section 7 Shock protection 87
7.1 Shock protection 87
7.1.1 Introduction 87
7.1.2 Protective measures 87
7.2 Protective measure: automatic disconnection of supply 88
7.2.1 Maximum disconnection times 88
7.2.2 Current causing automatic operation of protective device within the required time (la) 89
7.2.3 Maximum earth fault loop impedance (Z41) 89
7.1 Circuit calculations 92
7.3.1 Example 93
Section 8 Protection against fault current 9 5
8.1 The adiabatic equation 95
8.1.1 Introduction to the adiabatic approach 95
8.1.2 Protection by one device 96
8.1.3 Fault current protection 96
8.1.4 Selection or calculation 96
8.2 Selection from Table 54.7 97
8.2.1 Protective conductors of same material as the line and neutral conductors 97
8.2.2 Protective conductors of a different material to the line and neutral conductors 97
8.3 Introduction to calculations 99
8.3.1 Protective conductors are required to carry leakage currents and earth fault currents 99
8.4 Simple calculation 99
8.4.1 Zs known 100
8.4.2 Circuit-breakers 101
8.5 Energy let-through calculation 102
8.5.1 Circuit-breakers other than those to BS EN 60898 or BS EN 61009 102
8.5.2 Example 103
8.5.3 Types B, C and D circuit-breakers and residual-current circuit-breakers (with overcurrent protection) 103
8.6 Plotting protective conductor adiabatics 106
8.7 Protective conductor as a sheath or armour of a cable 111
8.8 Plotting of cable armour adiabatics 112
8.9 Calculation of armour capability 114
8.9.1 Example using fuse characteristics 115
8.10 Conduit and trunking 118
8.10.1 Example 118
8.10.2 Common protective conductors 118
8.11 Where residual current devices (RCDs) are used for automatic disconnection of supply 119
8.12 Earthing and bonding conductors 120
8.12.1 Earthing conductor 120
8.12.2 Main protective bonding conductors 122
8.12.3 Supplementary bonding conductors 122
Section 9 Calculations associated with testing 127
9.1 General 127
9.2 Continuity 128
9.2.1 Example 128
9.3 Continuity of ring final circuit conductors 129
9.3.1 Introduction 129
9.3.2 Calculation of the expected measured reading between line and protective earth (PE) at a point on the ring 129
9.3.3 Calculation of the minimum reading as a percentage of maximum reading and percentage deviation 131
9.3.4 Example 131
9.4 Earth fault loop impedance Zs 133
9.4.1 BS 7671 earth fault loop impedance tables 133
9.4.2 Earth fault loop impedance corrections for temperature 133
9.5 Reduced cross-sectional area protective conductors 135
Section 10 Impedance of copper and aluminium conductors 137
10.1 Introduction 137
10.2 Conductor resistance and temperature 137
10.2.1 Example 138
10.3 Impedance of cables from voltage drop tables 138
10.3.1 Single-phase 138
10.3.2 Three-phase 139
Section 11 Harmonics 143
11.1 Introduction 143
11.2 Cable ratings 144
11.2.1 Example 1 145
11.2.2 Example 2 145
11.3 Voltage drop 145
11.3.1 Cable sizes larger than 16 mm2 146
11.3.2 Cable sizes 16 m m2 and smaller 146
11.3.3 Examples with cable size over 16 mm2 146
11.4 Overcurrent protection 147
11.4.1 Example 148
Section 12 Protection against voltage disturbances 149
12.1 Introduction 149
12.2 Overvoltages 149
12.3 Power frequency fault voltages 149
12.4 Power frequency stress voltages 153
12.5 Earthing of 11 kV substations 153
Section 13 Busbar trunking 155
13.1 Symbols 155
13.2 Voltage drop 155
13.2.1 Example 1 155
13.2.2 Example 2 155
13.3 Fault currents 156
13.3.1 Example 157
Section 14 Prosumer's electrical installations (PEIs) 159
14.1 Introduction to prosumer's electrical installations (PEIs) 159
14.2 Supply characteristics of PEIsin different operating modes 160
14.2.1 Connected mode 160
14.2.2 Island mode 161
14.3 Overcurrent protection and connection of generators 161
Appendix A Symbols 163
Appendix B Standard final circuits 167
Appendix C Avoidance of unintentional operation of circuit-breakers 177
C1 Lighting circuit applications 178
C1-1 Example 179
Appendix D Further cable calculations 181
D1 Cable life 181
D1-1 British Cables Association 181
D2 Temperatures (core and sheath) (Effect of load current on conductor operating temperature) 182
D3 Inductance of cables in parallel 182
D4 Calculation of sheath voltages 183
D4-1 Example 184
D5 Earth fault loop impedance calculations for cables according to NA.4 of
National Annex NA to PD CLC/TR 50480:2011 1 84
D5-1 Introduction 184
D5-2 Cables in steel conduit where the conduit is used as the circuit protective conductor (NA.4.2 of PD CLC/TR 50480) 185
D5-3 Cables in steel trunking where the trunking is used as the circuit protective conductor (NA.4.3 of PD CLC/TR 50480) 186
D5-4 Steel wire armoured multicore cables where the armour is used
as the circuit protective conductor (NA.4.4 of PD CLC/TR 50480) 186
D5-5 External circuit protective conductor in parallel with steel wire armoured multicore cable (NA.4.5 of PD/CLC-TR 50480) 186
D5-6 Aluminium armoured single-core cables where the armour is used as the circuit protective conductor (NA.4.6 of PD/CLC-TR 50480) 187
Appendix E Symbols from PD CLC/TR 50480:2011 189
Appendix F Equipment data 191
Index 207

Tags: Electrical Installation Design Guide 2022, Calculations for Electricians 2022 pdf, Electrical Installation Design Guide pdf

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Reviews (3)
Nathaniel
Nathaniel
03/02/2023
I read the description. Liked. I bought it, I don’t regret it.
Bruce
Bruce
02/10/2022
The experience was positive.
Craig
Craig
02/10/2022
Good afternoon. Friends advised this service. I am glad I did. No regret.
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